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December 13, 2017

Rapert claims victory over Facebook; either way, he still doesn’t get 1st Amendment




Sen. Jason Rapert sent me a Tweet early this morning claiming that Facebook had relented and reinstated some anti-Muslim Facebook posts that had been removed for violation of the private social media company’s “community standards.”

His Tweet is shown above.

Perhaps I’m looking the wrong place. I don’t find them in an immediate search of this Rapert Facebook page. 

UPDATE: Apparently I’m excluded from the Facebook page on which Rapert posts his most repugnant rants.

I’ll update if I can find a link to the supposedly restored posts.

Either way, some further constitutional law instruction is necessary for the Bully of Bigelow.

In case you missed Rapert’s weekend eruption, he commented on Facebook after the New York bombing:

Regardless of who is responsible for these events today – we need to round up every single Muslim extremist sympathizer and other anti-American crazies and detain them or deport them. And for goodness sake – stop bringing more Muslims into this nation.

The First Amendment says:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Remedial education for Jason Rapert:

The amendment pertains to Congress and, by extension, other arms of government. Government may not restrict speech. A private company, Facebook, is free to impose its own editing standards, including a refusal to publish, for example, hateful remarks about a world religion.

But, Rapert’s call to ban Muslims from the United States would require government action. To evict Muslims or to ban entry of Muslims on account of religion would, of course, be a religious test. That IS unconstitutional. It’s the kind of thing that the Founding Fathers had in mind when they wrote the document.

Maybe a monument to the Bill of Rights could be of more use at the Capitol than the Ten Commandments monument Rapert is pushing. The Arkansas legislature disrespects both regularly.

To illustrate how off-base Rapert is, here’s a Tweet from a Twitter account from which he blocks me. But Twitter has many backdoors to see the rants of bigots. (Is Rapert violating my First Amendment rights by preventing me from commenting on his Facebook page by blocking me. Of course not. He’s merely a wuss.)



Sen. Jason Rapert sent me a Tweet early this morning claiming that Facebook had relented and reinstated some anti-Muslim Facebook posts that had been removed for violation of the private social media company’s “community standards.”

His Tweet is shown above.

Perhaps I’m looking the wrong place. I don’t find them in an immediate search of this Rapert Facebook page. 

UPDATE: Apparently I’m excluded from the Facebook page on which Rapert posts his most repugnant rants.

I’ll update if I can find a link to the supposedly restored posts.

Either way, some further constitutional law instruction is necessary for the Bully of Bigelow.

In case you missed Rapert’s weekend eruption, he commented on Facebook after the New York bombing:

Regardless of who is responsible for these events today – we need to round up every single Muslim extremist sympathizer and other anti-American crazies and detain them or deport them. And for goodness sake – stop bringing more Muslims into this nation.

The First Amendment says:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Remedial education for Jason Rapert:

The amendment pertains to Congress and, by extension, other arms of government. Government may not restrict speech. A private company, Facebook, is free to impose its own editing standards, including a refusal to publish, for example, hateful remarks about a world religion.

But, Rapert’s call to ban Muslims from the United States would require government action. To evict Muslims or to ban entry of Muslims on account of religion would, of course, be a religious test. That IS unconstitutional. It’s the kind of thing that the Founding Fathers had in mind when they wrote the document.

Maybe a monument to the Bill of Rights could be of more use at the Capitol than the Ten Commandments monument Rapert is pushing. The Arkansas legislature disrespects both regularly.

To illustrate how off-base Rapert is, here’s a Tweet from a Twitter account from which he blocks me. But Twitter has many backdoors to see the rants of bigots. (Is Rapert violating my First Amendment rights by preventing me from commenting on his Facebook page by blocking me. Of course not. He’s merely a wuss.)

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