Saturday, April 20, 2019
Tags Posts tagged with "severe"

severe

Arkansas school districts are closing on Thursday, April 18 due to severe flooding and multiple road closures.

DELAYS/CLOSINGS

  • ABUNDANT LIFE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING
  • ARKANSAS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY – BRYANT — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING
  • AVILLA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING
  • BAUXITE SCHOOL DISTRICT — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING – AMI DAY
  • BENTON SCHOOL DISTRICT — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING
  • BRYANT SCHOOL DISTRICT — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING – AMI DAY
  • SHERIDAN SCHOOL DISTRICT — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING
  • SIATECH LITTLE ROCK CHARTER HS — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING
  • PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTIRCT — CLOSED DUE TO FLOODING – AMI DAY

OTHER:

The Lonoke School District said they will have buses running flood routes on Thursday, April 18th. Their bus drivers have been told to avoid driving on hazardous roads and will not be picking up students that live on these roads. If you feel that your child may be affected by this please make other arrangements for getting them to school in the morning.

It may be safe to assume that if your bus is over 10 minutes late, your road has been considered unsafe to drive on.

0

Severe thunderstorms are expected to develop late this evening across Oklahoma and Texas and then move into Arkansas around Midnight.

The southern line of storms will consist of storms that develop along the dry-line and will likely be severe. At this point it appears the worst of these storms could stay to our south.

The northern line of storms will develop along a cold front in Kansas and Oklahoma and weaken as it moves east.

Lingering rain will be ongoing for Thursday morning.

The main threat with all storms will be large hail. A few storms could contain damaging wind. A limited tornado threat also exists with any isolated storms that develop ahead of the line.

-Garrett

After a gorgeous Friday it may be difficult to believe that severe weather is expected for parts of the state on Saturday.

First is important to note that there will be a sharp cut-off on where the severe weather is possible and it is all dependent of the track of the low pressure and position of the warm front. No severe weather is expected to the northwest of Little Rock.

Check out the map below for which parts of the state could see severe weather starting early as 1 p.m. Saturday for south Arkansas and expanding north through the day until as late as 11 p.m.

Severe wx threat

KTHV

RED ZONE: (Camden, Monticello, Warren, El Dorado)  Severe Weather Likely, with storms in the afternoon and evening possibly producing large hail, damaging winds, and tornadoes (including strong and long-tracked).

ORANGE ZONE: (Pine Bluff, Arkadelphia, Stuttgart)  Severe Weather Possible with storms in the afternoon and evening capable of producing damaging winds, large hail and a weak spin-up tornado.

YELLOW ZONE: ( Hot Springs, Little Rock) Low risk of severe weather but some storms in the evening could produce damaging winds and large hail. Tornado threat low.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Stay weather aware.

Download the THV11 app and make sure you have settings to allow weather alerts.

Make sure your NOAA radio is good to go.

If you live in a mobile or manufactured home have a place to go that is much safer, a shelter, another home that is well constructed and anchored to the ground with interior rooms that do not have windows.

Below is some advice from the National Weather Service on tornado safety.

Wx safety

KTHV

EXPECTED SCENARIO:

A low pressure system will develop in east Texas and swing across central Arkansas through the day on Saturday dragging a cold front through the area Saturday evening. As the low develops it will pull in warm and moist air from Louisiana into southern parts of the state. This will set the stage for the potential of severe weather in this area.

The tornado risk is high in southeast Arkansas because there are high winds about 5,000 feet that will cause the storms to rotate in this region.

Wx graph 1

KTHV

Wx graph 2

KTHV

FLASH FLOODING:

Heavy rain through the day could cause smaller creeks and streams to rise out of their banks. Water could also pond in low lying or poor drainage areas. Rainfall totals from this event will range from 1 to 3”. Isolated locations could see more if heavy rain falls in a location for a long period of time.

Rain

KTHV

FUTURE RADAR: The time could be off a couple of hours.

Below shows what the radar is expected to look like through the day. We will be watching the potential of supercells developing in the RED ZONE ahead of the cold front as it charges through Saturday afternoon and evening. The threat of severe weather should be done for Arkansas by 11 p.m.

If there is sunshine in southeast or south Arkansas, the threat of severe weather will increase. Sunshine in this set-up is like adding fuel to the fire.

8 a.m. wx

KTHV

12 p.m. wx

KTHV

3 p.m. wx

KTHV

5 p.m. wx

KTHV

8 p.m. wx

KTHV

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) – The Latest on severe spring storm (all times local):

1 p.m.

Several Midwestern states are digging out from a spring snowstorm, while the South braces for weekend thunderstorms that could bring tornadoes.

Strong winds and snow lingered Friday in parts of Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota, a day after a spring storm buried parts of the states and created dangerous travel conditions.

The National Weather Service says strong winds and hail are now expected in the South. Forecasters say tornadoes are also possible Saturday in parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas and eastern Texas, and then Sunday in Georgia.

The weather service’s office in Birmingham, Alabama, is advising church pastors to watch the weather during Sunday services, warning that large rooms like sanctuaries and auditoriums aren’t safe during severe weather.

National Weather Service forecaster Greg Gust says a low pressure system in the southwest U.S. created two separate “chunks of energy.” He says one hit the Midwest and other will hit the South in a “one-two punch.”

___

9 a.m.

Strong winds and more snow are expected in the Midwest after a spring storm buried several states in snow and created dangerous travel conditions.

The storm lingered Friday in parts of Minnesota, South Dakota and North Dakota, but the system is expected to weaken as it moves north. Several snow-packed highways remain closed in Nebraska, and forecasters say unseasonably low temperatures will linger through the weekend.

Thursday’s blizzard was the second “bomb cyclone” storm system to hit the region in a month. It closed highways, knocked out power to tens of thousands of people and left behind 25 inches of snow (63.5 centimeters) in northeast South Dakota.

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem closed government offices in most of the state for a third straight day Friday. Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz declared a state of emergency in much of his state, where the Minnesota State Patrol has responded to more than 500 crashes since Wednesday.

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