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A messy, unsettled weather pattern is here for the next several days, including Father’s Day. However, overall rain chances have decrease a bit for Sunday. Pockets of heavy rain and a few rumbles of thunder will be in western Arkansas throughout the morning with isolated pop-up storms throughout the afternoon.

VIDEO FORECAST

TIMING

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

THREATS

Morning – A few rumbles of thunder and pockets of heavy rain. The rain will be scattered as it moves in from Oklahoma. There may be some gusty winds with the strongest cells.

Afternoon – Isolated pop up thunderstorms could create some lightning and gusty winds.

LOCATION

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Futurecast 5AM:  Storms weakening while crossing the state line

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Futurecast 10AM:  Leftover showers and storms

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Futurecast 5PM:  Isolated storms popping up throughout the Ozarks.

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

Complete Father’s Day Forecast

-Matt

Arkansas Nuclear One responds to flooding concerns in Pope County

POPE COUNTY, Ark. — The National Weather Service said that three of the six Arkansas River locations (Conway, Morrilton, and Russellville) in central Arkansas will reach record high flood flows, and has warned those who live near the river to evacuate as soon as possible.

People in Pope County have been asking about Arkansas Nuclear One and what will happen with the flooding.

Arkansas Nuclear One officials sent out a response to those concerns:

“Personnel have reviewed existing procedures and strategies for elevated lake and river levels at the station. Station emergency planning staff members are maintaining regular communications with the Arkansas Department of Health which is monitoring conditions in the area. No adverse effects are anticipated for A-N-O.At Entergy, they said they’ve performed assessments, extensive testing and re-analyzed the potential of floods at all nuclear plants. Oure employees are experienced, highly trained and are prepared to respond to a variety of off-normal situations.”

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The Latest: Braggs, Oklahoma completely surrounded by water

TULSA, Okla. (AP) – The Latest on major flooding Oklahoma and Arkansas from severe weather across the central U.S. (all times local):

4:30 p.m.

Officials say a small town in eastern Oklahoma is completely surrounded by water and without power from major flooding on the Arkansas River.

Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Cain says about 260 residents live in Braggs and it is not clear how many people evacuated before the flooding began.

Cain says Muskogee County officials are urging voluntary evacuations of low-lying areas along the river, where water could be seen up to roofs. Wagoner County officials are also urging evacuations for areas along both the Arkansas and the rising Verdigris River.



Cain says water rescue teams are on their way to assist in Muskogee, Wagoner, Rogers and Nowata counties.

Across the state, 87 people have been injured in the flooding, which has not yet peaked in some areas.

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12:10 p.m.

Oklahoma officials are urging residents to prepare to evacuate some Tulsa neighborhoods that are near stressed, old levees along the Arkansas River.

City officials said Saturday that people living west of downtown should consider leaving for higher ground, even though the levees aren’t currently considered to be in danger of failing.

Mayor G.T. Bynum says the levees were built in the 1940s and haven’t had to hold back this much water since 1986. Officials also say the levees will need to hold back that amount of water until at least Wednesday, which is three days longer than they previously expected.

Officials say if an evacuation becomes necessary, it would need to happen quickly.

The Arkansas River in Tulsa was four feet above flood stage Friday.

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Severe Weather Impacts Blood Supply In Fort Smith

FORT SMITH, Ark. (KFSM) — All of the flooding and severe weather in our area over the last few days has impacted the blood supply at the Arkansas Blood Institute (ABI) in Fort Smith.

The agency is issuing a call to donors of all blood types to give blood as soon as possible to prevent a shortage.

ABI says it needs about 1,200 donors per day to maintain an adequate supply.

If you would like to make a donation you can stop by the office at 5300 South U in Fort Smith.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (Reuters) – A relentless barrage of violent weather in the central United States left three people dead on Thursday, local media said, as tornadoes raked across southwest Missouri and devastated the state capital, and heavy rain flooded rivers in Oklahoma.

The reported casualties from the tornadoes, which struck Missouri in the middle of the night, brought the week’s weather-related death toll in the region to at least seven, as forecasters said the rain and threat of damaging winds were expected to continue.

“It looks to stay quite wet over the next week across the central portion of the country,” said meteorologist Mark Chenard of the National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland.

A system of showers stretching from the Texas Panhandle and western Oklahoma north to Nebraska were to bring flooding risks on Thursday, Chenard said. A somewhat diminished threat of tornadoes will persist from the Texas Panhandle through Kansas, he added.

The weather service’s St. Louis office confirmed tornadoes touched down near Joplin, Missouri, late Wednesday, and local media, including the Joplin Globe, reported at least three dead.

In Jefferson City, the state capital, officials said a “massive” twister caused widespread damage to buildings, trees, cars and power lines, but no fatalities.

“Many, many buildings have significant damage, and there’s a lot of them that just have small damage as well, so it’s just very widespread,” Jefferson City Mayor Carrie Tergin told CNN.

Missouri Governor Mark Parson said at least 20 people were treated at hospitals for injuries, most of them released shortly thereafter, and praised the city’s tornado warning system.

“That’s why we didn’t have any fatalities in Jefferson City last night, why we didn’t have more injuries,” Parson said on CNN.

Weather forecasters expect the region to get another two inches (5 cm) of rain through Friday.

Violent weather kills three in Missouri, floods rivers in Oklahoma

Slideshow (6 Images)

Earlier this week, a tornado killed at least one person in Iowa, while two people in Oklahoma were killed in accidents on rain-slicked roads and another died in flooding, which continues to threaten many parts of the state.

The Arkansas River-front town of Webbers Falls was ordered evacuated on Thursday, while residents of several other rain-swollen riverfront communities were advised to leave, Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Caine said by phone.

Rainfall in the coming days is predicted to be about 2 inches (5 cm) across eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, and into western Missouri, with localized spots getting up to 5 inches (13 cm), forecasters said.

Reporting by Peter Szekely in New York and Rich McKay in Atlanta, Editing by William Maclean and Tom Brown

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

The Latest: Many Oklahoma rivers crest; warnings remain

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – The Latest on severe weather moving across the central United States (all times local):

6:55 a.m.

Flood warnings remain in effect for much of Oklahoma, though forecasters said many rivers have crested and water levels were beginning to drop.

More than 9 inches (23 centimeters) of rain has fallen since Sunday in parts of Oklahoma after an already rainy spring.

Near Crescent, about 34 miles (55 kilometers) north of Oklahoma City, erosion left several homes hanging over the swollen Cimarron River. One unoccupied home rolled into the river, and authorities said others could collapse.



In Arkansas, forecasters issued flood warnings along the Arkansas River because of the expected rush of water coming from Oklahoma.

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6:20 a.m.

Gov. Mike Parson says storms that slammed Missouri overnight left devastation across much of the state and it was fortunate that only three fatalities have been reported.

Parson said as of early Thursday authorities are not aware of any other people missing but noted that could change as daylight arrives.

The governor credited the low fatality count to the work of numerous safety and law enforcement agencies for warning people across the state about the impending storms.

The three fatalities were reported near Golden City in southwest Missouri.

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6 a.m.

Authorities say a pair of barges that broke loose on the swollen Arkansas River in Oklahoma and threatened to crash into a dam are now stuck on rocks.

The news Thursday morning comes as a relief in the small town of Webbers Falls, where emergency officials had warned of “catastrophic” flooding if the barges struck the dam. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says the barges are still tied together, and crews are working to secure them.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation says the Interstate 40 bridge and a state highway bridge remain closed over the Arkansas River at Webbers Falls as a precaution.

Over Memorial Day weekend in 2002, a barge struck the Interstate 40 bridge pier at Webbers Falls, causing part of the bridge to collapse into the Arkansas River. Fourteen people died after their vehicles plunged into the water.

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5:30 a.m.

A tornado has caused heavy damage in Missouri’s capital city as severe weather swept across the state overnight, causing three deaths and trapping dozens of people in the wreckage of their homes.

The National Weather Service confirmed that the large and destructive tornado moved over Jefferson City shortly before midnight on Wednesday.

Gov. Mike Parson said three people died. Missouri Public Safety said they were killed in the Golden City area of Barton County. The governor is praising first responders who have worked through the night to free people from homes that have been ripped apart in the storm.

Jefferson City Police Lt. David Williams says no deaths were reported in the capital, but 20 people have been rescued by emergency personnel.

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(Reuters) – Weather forecasters on Wednesday expected drenching rains to roll into the storm-ravaged U.S. southern and central states, where thunderstorms and tornadoes killed at least three people and triggered widespread flooding.

Rain, flooding expected in U.S. Southern Plains after deadly storms

Rescue services help a man whose vehicle had been swept off the roadway by fast-moving water in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, U.S., May 21, 2019 in this picture obtained from social media on May 21, 2019. Broken Arrow Fire Department/via REUTERS

More than 30 tornadoes struck a swath from Texas to Iowa since Monday, according to the National Weather Service, and residents in at least three Oklahoma riverfront communities were urged to evacuate due to flooding.

One person was killed and another was injured when a tornado struck the rural town of Adair, Iowa, about 50 miles (80 km)west of Des Moines, at about 1:30 a.m. local time, the weather service said.

While the weakening storm system moved into the Great Lakes region early Wednesday, another system was expected to brew Wednesday night into Thursday, said Brian Hurley, a forecaster with the service’s Weather Prediction Center.

“The southern Plains can’t catch a break,” Hurley said. “That whole area is still under the gun.”

Rainfall is predicted to be about 2 inches (5 cm) across eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, and into western Missouri, with localized spots getting up to 5 inches (13 cm), he said.

In Oklahoma, heavy rainfall prompted the Army Corps of Engineers to plan to increase the water flow at the Keystone Dam on the Arkansas River by nearly 30%, putting some low-lying communities at risk.

State emergency officials issued evacuation advisories for residents in parts of the Tulsa suburb of Sand Springs, Fort Gibson, about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Tulsa, and Webbers Falls, 70 miles (113 km) southeast of Tulsa.

“At this point it is voluntary,” Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokesman Jerry Lojka said by phone.

“The major concern is that all of those communities are right on the Arkansas River,” said Lojka. “They’re pretty close to flood stage as it is and if they increase the flow, they’re afraid that it’s going to go over its banks.”

In Missouri, cresting rivers prompted Governor Mike Parson to declare a state of emergency on Tuesday.

Forecasters said the Missouri River was expected to crest on Thursday at more than 32 feet (9.75 meters) at the state capital, Jefferson City. Local media said that would be 2 feet (61 cm) higher than the city’s levees.

Two people died in a traffic accident late Monday on a rain-slicked Missouri highway, police said. Another seven people were injured in Wheatland when a tornado struck the Lucas Oil Speedway.

Reporting by Rich McKay in Atlanta; Additional reporting by Peter Szekely in New York; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe and Jonathan Oatis

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

IMAGES: 2 more Oklahoma towns urged to evacuate

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Latest on storm damage in the Southern Plains and Midwest (all times local):

12:30 p.m.

Residents of two more Oklahoma towns are being encouraged to leave their homes ahead of expected flooding that has also prompted flooding concerns in Missouri and Kansas.

Residents in the Tulsa suburb of Sand Springs and in Fort Gibson, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) southwest of Tulsa are being urged to evacuate because of flooding forecast on the Arkansas River.

Residents of Webbers Falls, some 70 miles (113 kilometers) southeast of Tulsa, were advised earlier to evacuate.

The National Weather Service reports the river was at 37 feet (11 meters) late Wednesday morning, 9 feet (2.74 meters) above flood stage and expected to reach 41 feet (12.5 meters) by Friday morning.

River levels were rising Wednesday, after days of severe weather that has been blamed on at least three deaths.

IMAGES: 2 more Oklahoma towns urged to evacuate

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11:55 a.m.

Severe storms that churned up tornadoes have prompted flooding concerns in Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma.

River levels were rising Wednesday, after days of severe weather that has been blamed on at least three deaths.

The deluge inundated roadways, closing highways in 17 Kansas counties, along with more than 330 Missouri roads.

Amtrak also suspended train service Wednesday and Thursday along a route between St. Louis and Kansas City because of congestion and flood-related delays.

In Oklahoma, officials are urging residents of Webbers Falls to evacuate as the Arkansas River heads toward near-historic levels.

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday night into Thursday.

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IMAGES: 2 more Oklahoma towns urged to evacuate

9:35 a.m.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt says more rain in the forecast is a big concern with parts of the state already flooded following severe weather that’s blamed for at least three deaths after also battering Iowa, Kansas and Missouri.

Stitt spoke at a news conference Wednesday in Tulsa following an aerial tour with Tulsa Mayor G.W. Bynum and other officials.

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday, the latest in a multi-day stretch of storms that have spawned dozens of tornadoes.

The National Weather Service has issued flood warnings in the northeastern corner of Oklahoma through the weekend. More than 8 inches (20 centimeters) of rain has fallen since Sunday in parts of Oklahoma after an already rainy spring .

IMAGES: 2 more Oklahoma towns urged to evacuate

9:05 a.m.

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says a woman apparently drowned after driving around a barricade into high water.

The unidentified woman’s body was sent to the state medical examiner’s office to confirm the cause of death. Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Cain said she isn’t yet listed as what would be the state’s first storm-related death.

The OHP says the woman drove onto the water covered roadway near Perkins, about 45 miles (72 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City and was swept off the highway.

A storm system that spawned numerous tornadoes since Sunday in Oklahoma has been followed by heavy rains that dumped more than 8 inches of rain in parts of the state.

The National Weather Service has issued flood and flash flood warnings for the northeastern corner of the state through the remainder of the week.

IMAGES: 2 more Oklahoma towns urged to evacuate

8:40 a.m.

Authorities say one person has been killed and another injured by what may have been a tornado that damaged a farmstead in southwest Iowa’s Adair County.

The Adair County Sheriff’s Office says first responders found the body of 74-year-old Linda Brownlee early Wednesday morning at the farm just east-southeast of Adair. Seventy-eight-year-old Harold Brownlee was flown to a Des Moines hospital.

Robert Kempf, emergency management coordinator for Adair and Guthrie counties, says the Brownlee home sits atop a hill, so the extensive damage could have been caused by straight-line winds. The National Weather Service is sending an assessment team to determine whether a tornado was involved.

Kempf says three outbuildings were destroyed at the farm, and two nearby houses were damaged as well.

The weather service says debris from the farmstead landed on nearby Interstate 80.

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6:40 a.m.

A small town in Oklahoma is urging residents to evacuate as the Arkansas River heads toward near-historic levels.

Forecasters say major flooding is expected in Webbers Falls, a town of about 600 people about 140 miles (225 kilometers) east of Oklahoma City.

According to the National Weather Service, the Arkansas River was at 34.5 feet (10.5 meters), or 6.5 feet (2 meters) above flood stage, as of Wednesday morning. The river was expected to rise to 40 feet (12 meters) by Thursday morning. The National Weather Service says the flooding poses an “extremely dangerous and life-threatening situation.”

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see severe weather Wednesday, the latest in a multi-day stretch of storms that have spawned dozens of tornadoes and caused two deaths in Missouri.